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BROWNING OF AMERICA - HIDDEN RACISM - MY STORY

BROWNING OF AMERICA - HIDDEN RACISM - MY STORY
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Trevor Noah talk a lot about race and “becoming black” in America. 

Growing up in India, I didn’t think of myself as a minority, or as a brown, or as other indian in India although skin color is a major factor in India. I identified as an Indian, and I never, ever anticipated that my racial identity would change one day.

Losing my identity in America is a big deal. In America, identity is everything. It is common to feel that your identity is threatened, and so it is always on your mind. This is especially true after Sept 11 and got worse since Trump became President. ( I am an independent with an inclination towards Republican policies)  Sometimes, You have to know who you are, and you have to be unapologetic about it.

I had neither the vocabulary nor the attitude to understand what was happening. I didn’t know words like “white privilege” or “micro aggression.” And I didn’t know what it meant to not be white, not even in theory until recently.

Sometimes, I feel I am  hypersensitive, annoying, and angry. It means I feel like a crazy person half the time, wondering if what just happens to me is actually racial discrimination or I am reading too much into things. 

As a public Health professional, I think, BROWNING OF AMERICA is inevitable. 

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According to the economist Jed Kolko,  the most common age for white Americans is 58, for Asians it’s 29, for African Americans it’s 27, and for Hispanics it’s 11. 

A new report out of the University of Wisconsin Madison’s Applied Population Lab found that white births are now outnumbered by white deaths in 26 states, up from 17 in 2014 and four in 2004.

02-Jan-2019

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Data suggests foreign born population will continue to increase

02-Jan-2019

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